Faith in Europe

With “Faith in Europe”, I want to show the spirituality within our societies. The work follows the different and colorful European communities who sustain and practice these old beliefs.

 

After a documentary I made in West Arica on the influence of secret societies and spirituality, I wanted to see and discover how this was present within my own culture and society. This is how I started the project. The work is not only focusing to the historic places and it’s people but I’m trying to capture that invisible feeling and atmosphere. The work “Faith in Europe -  between Belief and Reality” is about our desire for belief and identity. A connection to the earth we live on and the human search for spirituality.

Faith in Iceland - Viking religion Ásatrú

The Ásatrú fellowship was recognized as an official religion by the Icelandic government in 1973. Today 1% of Iceland’s population is a member of the pagan movement. An even larger amount of Icelanders believes in elves and hidden people. They live in special stones and are hidden in the dramatic landscape. Today many rituals and ceremonies are still taking place like sacrifices known as blót, seasonal celebrations where gifts were offered to the gods. Also other pagan influences can be found in Iceland like shamanism and many connections to the Norse religions.

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Faith in Ireland - modern druids

In Ireland their is a druid movement. It’s a form of modern spirituality or religion that promotes harmony and worship of nature. Like other Iron Age Europeans, the early Celts maintained a polytheistic mythology and religious structure. The followers hold ceremonies at diffrent times in the year, connected to the lunar calander. These gatherings and rituals happen mainly at night in dark woods and on historic hills. They are present within everyday life.

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Faith in Germany - culture of witches

The 1st century tribes of Germany did not “confine the gods within walls... but they worshiped outdoors in sacred woods and groves”(tacitus). Elements of Germanic mythology survived in the guise of fairy tales and other folk tales and customs like Walpurgis Night. This “Witches’ Night”, is believed to be the night ‘witches’ meet on the highest peak in the Harz Mountains, in central Germany. Here they meet, eat and perform cermonies and dances around a huge bonfire. It’s where they meet with the devil ( witches sabbat).

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